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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: When should I test my well water?
A:
It is recommended testing your well water when you are purchasing a new home and when you are drilling a new well, at the minimum. At West Valley Water, we recommend that you regularly test your water every two to three years.


Q: What do I need to test for?
A:
 We recommend that you test for six things - 1) Potability, 2) Lead, 3) Radon, 4) Arsenic, 5) Uranium, and 6) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC’s), however, whether or not you need to test for VOC’s depends on where you live.)

Q: What does potability mean?
A: 
Potability tells you whether or not your water is suitable for drinking. If your home has a well, this is the minimum test you need to perform and provides general information on the overall water quality. The potability test will check for the presence of bacteria, such as E.coli and coliform. The potability test will also determine if common chemicals, such as sodium, iron, chloride, sulfate, manganese, copper, and Nitrate-Nitrogen are present in excessive amounts.

Q: How does lead end up in my water?
A:
Lead in water comes from two main sources: pipes or soldering within your home or it can occur naturally from the water source. Many government home loans require you to test for lead if the home was built before 1978. Elevated levels of lead in water can cause brain, kidney and nervous system damage. Lead toxicity poisoning in infants and young children can impact mental and physical development.


Q: My air tested negative for radon. Do I still need to test my water for radon?
A:
Radon can be present in water, independently of radon in the air, and should be tested separately. If you already did a radon test and elevated levels were found, it is highly recommended to test water levels. Radon poisoning is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers and the second leading cause for smokers.
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Q: Is arsenic still really a concern nowadays?
A:
Yes! Arsenic and uranium occur naturally in bedrock and most deep wells are susceptible to contamination from arsenic and uranium. In general, arsenic is dangerous when directly ingested, like in your drinking water, for instance.

Q: Can well water issues be fixed?
A:
 Most well water issues can be remedied by water treatment.  Of course, to fix the contamination issue, the source should be determined by a Certified Water Treatment Professional.  

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